SUSAN WHITE


Shadow Sink at Fine Folk
June 11, 2019, 5:26 pm
Filed under: installations, thorn works

I currently have a thorn piece, Shadow Sink, installed in Fine Folk in the Crossroads in Kansas City, Missouri.  It needed to be moved back a few feet from the window and it was such a pleasure to see the ease and elegance with which Jeff Owen and his crew accomplished this task!

 

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Crating of “Rift”
September 18, 2018, 9:02 pm
Filed under: exhibitions, thorn works

The thorn piece, “Rift” is approximately 4′ wide and about 17′ long.  It will be going to the home of a collector in Kansas City in a few weeks. There was a bit of a lag between the time of de-installation of the piece and the re-installation of it in its new environment. I asked for help from a wonderfully talented art handler and mover.  I couldn’t be more pleased with his solution for transporting and storing this piece.  An elegant solution with such a light touch.  Looks like a new piece.  Thanks, Paul Churchill.

 

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Exhibition at Studios, Inc.
July 4, 2018, 11:25 pm
Filed under: exhibitions, installations, thorn works

This three person exhibition Autonomous Bodies featured the work of the three new resident artists,  Kathy Liao, Benjamin Rosenthal and me. It was on view from May 14 through June 15, 2018, at Studios, Inc. in Kansas City.  The show explored the ways in which the three of us address issues related to the body.  I’m particularly interested in the timeless relationship of the body to the landscape.  My piece, Rift, was related to systems both in the body and the landscape, such as neurological and vascular systems  as well as roots that burrow deeply into the soil.  I also had a series of  photographs, abstractions derived from pyrography,  that blurred line the line between flesh and the cosmos, sand and skin,  the unknown and the knowable.

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studiosinc:2018
March 15, 2018, 9:46 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

As a new resident artist at Studios, Inc. I am in a group exhibition that opened on March 9 and will be showing until April 13.    Here are a few images of my piece, Watcher.

It is a thorn installation photographed by the best photographer ever, EG Schempf.  Thank you, EG!  I am so pleased to be among this group of artists for the next three years.

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Ephemera at the Nerman Museum / Artist Lecture
January 11, 2018, 11:42 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

The exhibition, Ephemera, features the work of six sculptors : Michelle Segre, Kahlil Irving, Miles Neidinger, Rena Detrixhe, Brian Jungen and Susan White.

On opening night of the exhibition four of the six artists in the show gave brief talks.  I was one of those four.  I managed to give an overview of my work and then insert a bit of my world view and even a bit of humor. Check it out below:

http://www.susan-white.com/video.html

 



Kawsmouth Interview
January 2, 2018, 10:54 pm
Filed under: Uncategorized

Jennifer Wetzel from the online journal Kawsmouth came to my studio at the end of last year.  We had a great conversation, she took some photographs and she has written this article in the journal, Kawsmouth.  Such a nice way to start 2018!

Thank you Jennifer!

A studio visit with Susan White

 

 



River of Solace, River of Hope
November 22, 2017, 3:57 pm
Filed under: exhibitions, installations, thorn works

I currently have a thorn installation, River of Solace, River of Hope,on view at the Nerman Musem of Contemporary Art. It will be up until January 28, 2018 as part of the exhibition, Ephemera.  

Here are a couple of images, shot by photographer, EG Schempf, of the piece:

The installation is about 44’ long. It crawls along two walls and wraps around a corner. It is made of thorns from the honey locust tree, painted with oils. It is the first time that I have used oil paint on these thorns and I found the way that I could rub the paint into the thorns and the depth and variation of color to be very rewarding. The piece is a general reference to the power of art and the power of nature to offer inspiration, renewal and a kind of secular spirituality in these troubled times.

I have a couple of detail images in the strong light of my studio before I installed it at the museum :

Here is another detail taken in the more muted light of the museum gallery shortly after installation. One of these is the same thorn, I think. I respond to the gesture and the elegance of these forms.email IMG_0554

A friend asked how I had determined the color palette for this work and I couldn’t come up with a specific response immediately. I had selected some markers to make a drawing and I knew that I wanted them in rather muted tones.

This is an image of a wall in my studio that shows the working palettes and the rags that I used to rub the oil paint into the thorns as I worked…

Another detail of the final piece:

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A few weeks later, I was cleaning out some bark in the garage. There was a piece of bark, about 5-6 feet, from a honey locust tree that I had brought home and left in the garage for about six months, just because it was so lovely with lichen growing on it. I had parked next to it every day for months, and finally realized that I wasn’t going to do anything with it, so I took it out to the green recycling trash. However, I kept a small section and took it back to my studio.

At that point, I realized where the color palette had come from,

Oh.